Saving Christianity: New Thinking for Old Beliefs

Foreword by Bishop Willie Walsh. A radical and provocative challenge to Church beliefs. A major reason for the current crisis in Christian churches, Hilary Wakeman argues, is that their doctrines are simply not believable. In this readable and thought-provoking book she argues that many of the statements of belief that Christians are required to assent to as literal truth, such as Virgin Birth and the bodily Resurrection of Jesus, are driving many people out of the churches and keeping others out. She examines the main tenets of Christian beliefs and considers ways they can be brought up to date and expressed with honesty and integrity. Hilary Wakeman was among the first women ordained in the Church of England in 1994. 6 x 9

 

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Wakeman–one of the first women ordained a priest in the Anglican Church– candidly, commonsensically discusses one great predicament of the contemporary Christian church. Moderate Christianity is dying because churches are unwilling to consider their beliefs honestly and openly. She persuasively argues that to survive beyond the next generation, Christianity must find ways compatible with a twenty-first-century sensibility to express old truths. Much of her discussion is seen from her Irish perspective as rector of a parish in County Cork, yet it applies to Christianity in the broadest sense. For example, she lists the reasons so many people are leaving the institutional church to practice a faith that chooses from one religion what it can’t get from another; clerical scandals, ecclesiastical authoritarianism, and competition for free time are all factors. Many will be disturbed by her conclusions, especially her rational interpretations of such Christian basics as the Virgin Birth, the Resurrection, and the Trinity, but this is a brave book that asks what the meaning of truth is and dares to venture answers. June Sawyers
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

“Wakeman is compassionate yet pulls no punches, profound yet avoids theological stuffiness, accessible yet refuses to play to the church-bashing gallery.”
Topics: Theology & Religious Education. 8 Points: Eight points. Ages: Adult. Resource Types: Books.

Review & Commentary