Standing Still

Standing Still is another book of engaging, luminous and memorable stories about people who are on their everyday spiritual journey. The author reminds the reader to “remember the power of story to touch what might otherwise remain untouched in us, something deep in the soul that could be changed forever.” And she cautions readers, “Be prepared, for your life may be shaken or upended by the simple stories in this book.” At the end of each story, there are questions which will help you “stand still” to see what is happening in your life right now and experience “awe and reverence at the Mystery.”

Resource Types: Books.

Review & Commentary

One thought on “Standing Still

  1. Review

    Meredith Jordan, a professional counselor and spiritual director, has
    worked for twenty-five years with adults and children helping them see new
    vistas of relationships with the Mystery many people call God. In my review of
    her first book, Embracing The Mystery, The Sacred Unfolding in Ordinary People
    and Everyday Lives (2004), I pointed out that she does not conceive of the
    relationship of God to the world in the traditional paradigm of supernatural
    theism, of God, “out there” who occasionally 
    intervenes in human relationships and affairs. Her spiritual journey has
    led her to stand in the tradition of the mystics called panentheism, which sees
    God as “the encompassing Spirit” in “whom we live and move and have our being.”
    She writes, “I wrote Embracing The Mystery to inspire and encourage people of
    all traditions to look at what is right in front of them, to see that the
    indwelling Mystery we call God is at the tiller of our lives, guiding us from
    within and without in the direction of becoming our most expansive selves…and
    that the Mystery may appear as nothing like what we expect.” The forty stories,
    which comprise the book, illuminate the experience of the people embracing the
    Mystery in their everyday lives.

    The focus of her new book is to help people understand that “the
    Mystery – which is by its very nature never fully knowable – appears at
    different points along our spiritual trajectory in order to support us in our spiritual expansion or evolution.” In
    order that we may see the Mystery in the midst of everyday life she stresses
    that it is necessary to “stand still.” She explains that “standing still” is
    not a spiritual practice but “a way of
    being in the world
    that encourages us to notice that events or experiences
    wait in each given moment to claim our attention and be given to their best
    use.” As a way of being, standing still involves doing nothing in order to
    “intentionally create an empty space into which answers to our concerns, in
    their own right timing, gently unfold.” Standing still also means “to remember
    that the Mystery calls us to lives that are centered in mystery, wonder, awe,
    compassion, love and justice…and will lead us there, as if from an inner
    compass, if we make ourselves available to be led.” When we adopt standing
    still as a way of being in the world, we are open and available to be “touched
    and transformed by remarkable events that so easily pass unnoticed in the
    harried activities of our ordinary lives.”

    Standing Still is another book of engaging, luminous and memorable
    stories about people who are on their everyday spiritual journey. The author
    reminds the reader to “remember the power of story to touch what might
    otherwise remain untouched in us, something deep in the soul that could be
    changed forever.” And she cautions readers, “Be prepared, for your life may be
    shaken or upended by the simple stories

    in this book.” At the end of each story, there are questions which will
    help you “stand still” to see what is happening in your life right now and
    experience “awe and reverence at the Mystery.”

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