Take This Bread A Radical Conversion, The spiritual memoir of a twenty-first century Christian

From Publishers Weekly
Where is it written that literary women must move to coastal California (if they don’t already live there), become Episcopalians and write conversion memoirs? Miles, like recent memoirists Diana Butler Bass, Nora Gallagher and Lindsey Crittenden, loves Jesus and detests the religious right, though she is also critical of “the sappy, Jesus-and-cookies tone of mild-mannered liberal Christianity.” Mild-mannered she is not. Converted at age 46 when she impulsively walked into a church and received communion for the first time, the former war correspondent suddenly understood her life’s mission: to feed the hungry. What her parish needed, she decided, was a food pantry-and within a year (and over opposition from some fellow parishioners) she had started one that offered free cereal, fruit and vegetables to hundreds of San Francisco’s indigent every Friday. Not willing to turn anyone away, she raised funds and helped set up other food pantries in impoverished areas, occasionally “crossing the line from self-righteous do-gooder to crusading zealot.” For Miles, Christianity “wasn’t an argument I could win, or even resolve. It wasn’t a thesis. It was a mystery that I was finally willing to swallow.” Grittier than many religious memoirs, Miles’s story is a perceptive account of one woman’s wholehearted, activist faith. (Feb. 20)
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