Taste and See

From the Boundless Life collection

Taste and see how gracious the Christ is,
Taste and see the wonder of life;
Take the bread, the body of Jesus,
Break the bread, the flesh of the world;
Taste and see the wonder of life.

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O golden cup of life

From the Boundless Life collection

O golden cup of life,
A chalice full of love,
The space beyond all strife
You form our sacred home,
Your ways produce delight,
Your life becomes our own.

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Can bread and wine transform our minds

From the Boundless Life collection

Can bread and wine transform our minds
With all their complex modes?
Can sharing festive liturgies
Unlock empowering codes?

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Eucharistic Prayer

31 August 2014

Celebrant: God be with you
People: And also with you
Celebrant: Lift up your hearts.
People: We lift our hearts to God

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Family Service

St John’s Church, Norton Summit, Australia

We aim to present a service that offers accessibility to real Christian understanding and faith for people in today’s society who come with a broad range of needs.

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“This is my body.”

This body knows what it is like to have a nice house and a good job
It knows what it is like to feel uneasy about being wealthy

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Here Is Bread and Here Is Wine

Here is bread and here is wine,
Food and drink we savor with delight;
Now upon this altar blessed,
Moving us beyond our taste and sight.

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Deeper Love: A Song for Communion

For deeper love we spread the bread
I won’t be full till all are fed
Till every soul has home and bed
The rest of us can’t move ahead

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Invitation to the Sacrament

The invitation is announced
To greatest and to least;
For all are welcome; “Come with us;
Share this symbolic feast.”

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Ritual in Sacred Community: Reclaiming Eucharist

The central focus for Christian liturgy is the ritual Eucharist. Traditionally Eucharist (which means “thanksgiving”) has reenacted the last meal Jesus ate with his followers before the blood sacrifice of his execution at the hands of the Romans, but with the dogmatic interpretation that Jesus died to save sinners from hell in the next life. Twenty-first century progressive Christians are concerned more with living a life of justice-compassion here and now (as Jesus taught) than reconciling with a god that demands blood sacrifice in exchange for a carefree afterlife. What is required is to act with justice-compassion in radical abandonment of self-interest. Suppose that instead of terrorizing ourselves with the Advent of violent judgment, we were to celebrate the Advent of the Christ consciousness; instead of a Eucharist mourning the personal holocaust of Jesus’s death, a Eucharist of Ordination, in which we recommit ourselves to the great work of distributive justice-compassion? We have the power, at any moment, to transform the way we live our lives. We can choose not to participate in the retributive system of imperial war and systemic injustice. We can step into the kind of ongoing parallel universe of God’s justice-compassion at any moment. We can change our consciousness, change the paradigm in which we live, whenever we have the will to do so. Jesus is not coming again. We are; and when the rare opportunity presents itself, we can break the alabaster jar in remembrance of her.

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