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The Body Politic of God, Part II

Who Is the Whore of Babylon?

A typical interpretation when reading the Book of Revelation is John’s attempt to answer the interminable question: How exactly will God, once and for all, set things right? When will the “sorrow and weeping be no more,” and the “tear wiped from every eye?” After reinterpreting over and over again the imminent end that has been repeatedly put on indefinite hold, it merely begs the question, why the postponement?

When Revelation is instead understood to be political commentary spun in the form of a fantastic allegorical tale that can be reinterpreted and applied again and again, the question in each succeeding era has more to do with asking the question: Who is the Whore of Babylon, and all she represents? How can we be so easily seduced? And have the words and life of the Galilean sage been lost, even from the time John had his nightmarish vision to our own succumbing today? Read more.

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Clear Faith: Clearing Away Stumbling Blocks for a Faith that Makes Sense

Are you disillusioned by some aspects of Christianity, like having to believe the right things to “get saved”? Like the idea that an all-loving God would sentence anyone to hell? Like understanding an often contradictory Bible? Then meet CLEAR FAITH. Clear away those stumbling blocks to uncover a faith of your own that makes sense. Meet the Jesus we can truly call “brother.” By seeing with new eyes, through a clear lens, we can experience and live with a simple, straightforward faith that is globally inclusive, open, and compatible with a progressive, scientific worldview.

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Lectureship that Challenges What is, in the Name of What Can Be

21st century Christianity is thus wedded to the world view of its 1st century scriptures, its 4th century creeds and its 13th century liturgies. Consequently Christianity presents itself to potential modern believers encased in a series of doctrinal and liturgical forms, undergirded by a theological point of view that communicates almost nothing to those people who gather in church to worship. Why is there any surprise that the number of worshipers is in steep decline? Modern Christianity offers only two alternatives. The first is to close our minds to the explosion of knowledge in order to build a protective fortress around the religious formulas of antiquity.

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So You Think You’re Not Religious? A Thinking Person’s Guide to the Church, 1st Edition

founder of ProgressiveChristianity.org (TCPC)

In So You Think You’re Not Religious, James Adams sets himself a formidable task: asserting the value of Christian faith and practice to skeptics, and overcoming their very reasonable objections. It’s perhaps in his favor that he’s an extremely reasonable man, and that many of these objections were his own, at other times in his life. A powerful and practical introduction to the church for newcomers and old-timers alike. Topics include belief, the creed, sacraments, prayer, and belonging.

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Statement of Faith from All Desires Known

Janet Morley

O God, the source of our being
and the goal of all our longing,
we believe and trust in you.
The whole earth is alive with your glory,
and all that has life is sustained by you.
We commit ourselves to cherish your world,
and to seek your face.

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Gloria Dei, PA Statement of Faith

(used in place of the ancient creeds during our contemporary service)

We believe that the way we treat one another is the fullest expression of how we live out our faith.
We find our approach to God to the life and teachings of Jesus Christ who is our model for living and we recognize the faithfulness of other paths which may also lead people to an experience of God.

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The Woman’s Creed

Rachel Conrad Wahlberg from the book “Jesus and the Freed Woman” 1978

I believe in Jesus
, child of God
, chosen of God, born of the woman Mary
, who listened to women and liked them, 
who stayed in their homes
, who discussed the Kingdom with them, 
who was followed and financed 
by women disciples.

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Thoughts on a New Creed

The early Church appears to have been satisfied with the simple affirmation ‘Jesus is Lord’, discovering the Spirit in the power of resurrection. Perhaps our task as progressive Christians is to reinterpret these concepts for our present time. I suspect that this will have more to do with discipleship than with the worship of a divine Christ (Matt 7:21).

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Epting Credo

I believe in (trust in, not just intellectually assent to) a Power, Force, Rational Principle at the core of the Universe that is the Source of all that is. I believe it has a personal quality (i.e. “father/mother”). This Power is so much greater than anything we can imagine that, for all practical purposes, it is beyond measure and without limit (“all” powerful…at least in comparison with us).

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An Acknowledgement of our Creator

God, Creator Supreme, we are forever a part of the divine spirit that permeates our lives in every way, known and unknown. Your love is manifested in granting us the capacity to relate to the divine essence of life and being — toward an existence beyond mortality, having no end in the temporal domain of eternity.

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Credo for Christians

from OPEN CHRISTIANITY: Home by Another Road (St Johann Press, 2000)

I worship and adore God, source, essence, and aim of all things, spirit that enlivens all beings.
I follow the way of Jesus, who found God in himself and shared a way for others to find God in themselves.

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The Canberra Affirmation

As progressive Christians in the 21st century, we are uncomfortable with rigid statements of belief, as we recognise our understandings are shaped by life experiences within cultural and environmental contexts. Yet, there are some common understandings which continue to shape our lives, both individually and in community with others. These we seek to affirm and celebrate

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A Confession of Faith

“The Christian Creeds--A Faith to Live By” Monika Hellwig, 1973, Pflaum (revised for inclusive language)

We believe that happiness awaits humanity and that our existence is not absurd.

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Meaningful creeds for the 21st Century- Q and A with Bishop Spong

John Shelby Spong Question & Answer

Nina Brock from Ovando, Montana, writes: Question: Your comment in a recent column about Paul not being able to say the Nicene Creed prompts a question. We attended your week long seminar in Berkeley, CA, last summer …

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Nicene Creed (NEW)

We believe in God, the creative force that sustains and nurtures humanity in ways beyond our understanding. We believe that Jesus of Nazareth embodied the power of this force; extraordinarily able to grasp its meaning, he revealed …

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