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Imagining a Different World

I do not believe there is such a thing as a just war anymore, if there ever was one. Our weapons are too destructive and wars are seldom about territory or borders. They cannot be decisively won. Today wars are mostly about ideology and religion. They are about culture. Certainly we have not been winners in the last three wars which we have initiated and participated in. There are far more meaningful and sophisticated ways to deal with conflict today. We could do better if we developed different attitudes and skills at conflict resolution. It would also help if our leaders knew a little more about the history and cultures of the areas in which we get involved.

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SYRIA, POISON GAS, MISSILE STRIKES AND PEACE?

It has been both an emotional and a political roller-coaster. The television newscasters and the print media informed us that a political debate was underway as to whether or not the armed might of this country should be used to punish the Syrian government for violating the universal condemnation against chemical warfare that has governed the world since the horror of gas in the trenches in World War I. Pictures were released of small children, who had been the victims of sarin gas. The pictures were chilling. I enquired of a medical expert about the effects of sarin gas on the human body. He shuddered even to talk about it. His sentences were short and declarative. “It is deadly.” “There is no protection.” “Suffering is intense.” “Death is inevitable.” For almost one hundred years, despite brutal wars, both worldwide and local, with weapon enhancements like atomic power and cruise missiles, the prohibition against chemical warfare has still been generally adhered to by the nations of the world until this moment. Now the Syrian government has breeched this taboo, in an action widely believed to have been ordered by its president, Bashar al-Assad. I did not disagree with the official statement of facts and yet the debate itself struck me as deeply irrational.

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A Pessimist for Peace, And the Question of a Just War

Our nation is currently embroiled in a contentious debate over the Syrian regimeʼs alleged use of chemical weapons, and what should be the appropriate response by the U.S. and the international community. Public opinion polls comprising an odd coalition of liberal peace-nicks, a war weary citizenry and political antagonists who oppose in knee-jerk fashion most all of the Presidentʼs proposals, all suggest strong opposition to our countryʼs military involvement of any kind in yet another Middle East conflict. Regardless, the underlying question and dilemma remains. Is there a moral imperative to act? If so, how? What is the justification for a violent response to a deplorable, unjust and violent act?

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Syria: Groupthink or Grouppray?

With morbid fascination, I’m watching the leaders of the United States group-think their way into a counter-productive use of American military force. It’s disturbing to observe otherwise intelligent and well-motivated public servants drift into a bad decision.

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St. Augustine and Syria

Christianity has concerned itself with matters of war and peace for almost its entire history. The one unifying assumption of the faith has been that war is terrible and is to be avoided assiduously. There has always been a part of Christianity that has rejected war absolutely, considering participation in it to be completely contrary to the teachings of Jesus. But alongside it has been a strand of the faith that recognizes that war is morally justified in certain circumstances. “Just war theory” dates back to St. Augustine in the early days of the church. I think it still is a useful way of prayerfully considering whether or not a war, and/or one’s participation in it, is appropriate.

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Cards, Carols, and Claus

Christmas in Popular Culture and Progressive Christianity

An exploration in Christmas as a festival in popular culture and progressive Christianity, with an emphasis on Christmas cards, Carols by Candlelight, and Santa Claus. While the biblical infancy stories in Matthew and Luke are approached from a progressive Christianity perspective

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Without Doubt, Beyond Meaning

What is my reality?
Let doubts be cleared

Faith seeks insights whose truth bring freedom
When I struggle with preferences

The great way blurs
Hope unwraps positive insights

If I allow their insights to open

The great way clears

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Topics: Spiritual Exploration & Practice and Worship & Liturgy. Seasons & Special Events: All Seasons. Resource Types: Meditations and Poetry.

After Weeks of Reading Spong

Lord Jesus, whom we call Christ, hear our prayer:
We have finished the book. Were you here, reading over our shoulders? Listening to our comments? What do you think?

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Conjectures and Assertions

Science and religion often seem irreconcilable; yet ironically they share a common faith. Along with artists, social activists and others, they put their faith in the same entity: closed-minded thinking to sanction shared views. Thanks to this unsubstantiated restriction, few people challenge standardized ideas, events and actions.

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Giving Without Expectations- VIDEO

The Thai telecommunications conglomerate True is getting rave reviews worldwide for its latest spot, “Giving,” which tells the story of a man unexpectedly rewarded for a lifetime of good deeds he performed without expecting anything in return.

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