Celebrating the Marriage of Spirituality and Science: Review of “Ways To Go Beyond and Why They Work” by Rupert Sheldrake

In a previous book, Science and Spiritual Practices, British biologist Rupert Sheldrake devoted a chapter to each of the following practices and demonstrated how our brains are affected by doing them: Meditation; Gratitude; Reconnecting with the more-than-human world; Plants; Rituals; Singing, Chants and the Power of Music; Pilgrimages and Holy Places.  

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The Work Of The People

Work out your faith and renew hope through our film library of spiritual leaders and contemplative pieces.

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On the Authentic Life

A 5 part film study on transformation

This wonderfully rich resource contains five film lesson plans (video not included), each with links to alternate resources, movie reviews, background information and instructions on how to use this resource.

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Is Molly Bloom a Feminist Role Model?

Without mentioning religion or spirituality, the movie Molly’s Game dissects the American soul by revealing an underground world of gambling and male domination. It shows how our national ideal of material and financial success, with all the trimmings of status and power, can lead to unharnessed greed, self-destruction, and actualization of hell on earth.

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“Making God Necessary?”

A Response by

As anyone who’s read or listened to me share my journey over the years knows full well, I have now arrived at a place (at least for now!) where – in my thinking, and with the window through which I see the world these days – I call myself a “post-theist.”

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“Unbelievable” is believably clear and concise

Spong posits 12 theses to encourage a new reformation, a new re-formation of our spiritual lives. He begins with the theistic image of God, replacing the vision of God as a Supreme Being with God as Being itself. That first thesis challenges many fundamentals of creedal faith. Without a judgmental god to appease, there is no need of “God’s great rescue plan” for mankind, no need to limit our understanding of Jesus’ crucifixion as a sacrifice for the sins of all: “There can be no ‘substitutionary atonement’ in the Christianity of tomorrow.”

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A Secular and Spiritual Examination of the Soul of America

The Presidency is not merely an administrative office. That’s the least of it. It is more than an engineering job, efficient or inefficient. It is pre-eminently a place of moral leadership. All our great Presidents were leaders …

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The Truth at Last

A review of The Martyrdom of Thomas Merton: An Investigation by Hugh Turley and David Martin

For years I have spoken out about how fishy the official story of Thomas Merton’s sudden death smelled to me.  I have also, over the years, met three CIA agents who were present in Southeast Asia at …

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A black girl’s take on “A Wrinkle in Time”

“A Wrinkle in Time” was a must-see film for me. And, a must- see flick worldly different from dashing out to see “Black Panther.” It doesn’t mean, however, Ava Duvernay’s $100 million dollar film with a multicultural cast isn’t without problems. It is which is one of the reasons the film has received mixed reviews unlike “Black Panther’s” ongoing and wildly enthusiastic critical appraise.

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Concise Scrooge

Progressive thinkers cannot avail ourselves of the false security fundamentalist believers bring to church Sundays and to the Bible daily. We can, however, compensate for our dismissal of literalism with an answerably intense commitment to metaphor. And metaphor proves especially powerful in narratives. Narrative masters like Dickens can move our hearts as they bring our fellow creatures vividly and credibly alive. But they can do more: they can provoke our intellects and excite our imaginations. We love a story, instinctively, but we go a step farther and subject the tale to closer scrutiny and more probing critical analysis. (That, incidentally, is why I find Luke’s story of the road to Emmaus one of the most affecting New Testament narratives. It’s an account of a real-life journey, peopled with thoughtful and feeling human beings, who move from grief to joyful insight.)

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A Review of John Shelby Spong’s “Unbelievable”

By Zachary Houle

Once in awhile, a book comes along that completely shatters your Christian world view… Unbelievable basically takes all you think you knew about the church and the Bible, and aims to turn everything on its head.

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Who was “Detroit’s” intended movie audience?

Fifty years ago, this summer an urban rebellion took place. One hundred and fifty-nine riots erupted in African American cities across the country. The civil unrest took place in cities like New York, Atlanta, Chicago, Birmingham, and Boston, to name a few. The worst riots that summer were in Newark, New Jersey and Detroit, Michigan.

The movie “Detroit” attempts to capture the eponymous riot of 1967.

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My Journey with “A Beautiful Silence”

Inspired by the films of Terrence Malick and the poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke, the film tells the story of a young woman who is dealing with an intense case of spiritual doubt that has been building within her for quite some time. Plagued with nightmares, she arises early one morning, says a prayer by candlelight, and goes downstairs for a cup of tea and to quietly reflect on recent events. At this moment, we flashback to a worship service at her church. In a moment of frustration, she storms out, and is followed by a friend who confronts her and reminds her that doubt, in and of itself, is not a bad thing.

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Book Review – “The Three Secrets” of Aging by John C. Robinson

Review by Carol Orsborn, Editor in Chief, Fierce with Age

This month’s Digest is a special edition, dedicated for the first time solely to the work of one thought leader. I encountered Dr. John C. Robinson’s work on aging 5 years ago. Until then, I thought of spirituality as a solution to the challenges of aging. Over time, I grew to view aging as a spiritual path. But it was John Robinson’s books that opened the portal to my understanding of aging as a mystical experience, in and of itself.

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The Soul of Christmas

With a review by Frederic & MaryAnn Brussat, Spirituality & Practice

The Christ Child reminds us of the infinite possibilities of life available to us, and we celebrate that vitality in the season of good cheer, gift-giving, and community. Christmas also offers an opportunity to get in touch with our own mystical side, to recreate the Nativity in our hearts. “If we could but mix just a small measure of the child’s naïveté with an intelligent appreciation of the traditional Christmas symbols, myths, and images,” Moore asserts, “we might be surprised at the profundity.” The enchantment of Christmas is a taste of what is possible if human beings could really love each other. The infant in the manger symbolizes new life, the potential all human beings have to be a new kind of being dedicated to agape, a love of the other—whoever that “other” may be.

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Book Review: Prayers of Via De Cristo: Calls to Worship for Progressive Christians

by James Armstrong

  For the many churches that have asked us for a book with calls to Worship and other liturgies, we now have an excellent one. It is Prayers of Via De Christo. It is the product of …

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Book Review by Duane M. Gebhard: “Testing Traditions and Liberating Theology”

Val Webb, a lay theologian par excellence, set out to address a void in the realm of conversations about faith, praxis, and the written word. In her most recent book she not only enters the space that is so often left untouched with careful explanation and teaching, she also assists the reader to gain new understandings and find a voice in the dialogue of faith and life. Entering the book, one hears the invitation to put on earphones and be guided through the development of Christian theology from the time of the disciples through to followers of Christ in this day, as though one were being led through a museum of the development of artistic expression.

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Storyteller’s Storyteller: Joan Chittister

Book Review of

As storytellers go, Joan Chittister is one of the best! That she is also an extraordinary theologian who has an uncanny ability to communicate wisdom in ways that both enlighten and enchant her audiences is a wonder to behold. Here Sister Joan weaves two tales from one of her latest books “Two Dogs and a Parrot.” While I am throughly enjoying the book, I dearly wish that I could watch and listen to her embody more of these stories as only she can. Enjoy!

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