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Stories in the Scriptures: A novelist’s approach to the Bible

Stories in the Scriptures: A novelist’s approach to the Bible

by Robert Crompton

 

 

Stories in the Scriptures offers a way of reading familiar texts from a fresh perspective. Robert Crompton comes to the ancient narratives in the role of a story-teller and asks, not, “What must we believe?” but, “What real situations might have prompted people just like ourselves to tell these tales?”

In trying to find possible answers to questions of this sort, Robert finds himself drawn closer to the people behind the stories. Ordinary people who really are just like ourselves, who loved to tell their tales – to inform, to entertain, and maybe sometimes even to mislead. Real people to whom we can relate and who can inspire us to tell our own stories.

Stories in the Scriptures tells the story of Robert’s involvement with the Bible over many years from early childhood to retirement and beyond. Also it offers what will be of interest to people who, having defected from very authoritarian versions of Christian belief, nevertheless wish to continue some engagement with biblical and religious issues. There will be some who simply want to lay to rest various lingering problems of belief which may persist long after defection. Others may be seeking a new religious fellowship but are wary of coming under pressure to assent to any rigid doctrinal package. Yet others just find the topics fascinating and wish to find out what someone else might think. Wherever you are along this spectrum, Stories in the Scriptures is for you.

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Robert Crompton is a Methodist Minister and a Novelist. He has taken on lots of other roles too – in the chemical industry and in town planning. At heart though, he is a storyteller and in that role he comes the ancient narratives of the Bible and asks, not “What must we believe?”, but “What real situations might have prompted people just like ourselves to tell these tales.”

In trying to find answers to questions of this sort, Robert finds himself drawn closer to the people behind the stories. Ordinary people who really are just like ourselves – who loved to tell their tales – to inform, to entertain, and maybe even sometimes to mislead. Real people to whom we can relate and who can inspires us to join in and tell our own stories. Visit his website at  RobCrompton.org.

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