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Unsettling the Word: Biblical Experiments in Decolonization

 

For generations, the Bible has been employed by settler colonial societies as a weapon to dispossess Indigenous and racialized peoples of their lands, cultures, and spiritualties.  Given this devastating legacy, many want nothing to do with it.  But is it possible for the exploited and their allies to reclaim the Bible from the dominant powers?

In Unsettling the Word, over 60 Indigenous and Settler authors come together to wrestle with the Scriptures, re-imagining the ancient text for the sake of reparative futures.  Read through new lenses, the biblical texts come alive in fresh and surprising ways.

 

 

Reviews

“The Bible has been used in so many contexts as a text for colonization, exclusion, and cultural genocide. Unsettling the Word invites us to rediscover the Bible as a text of liberation, not occupation, of life, not death.” —Rev. Dr. Mitri Raheb, Bethlehem – Palestine

“Unsettling the Word is an extremely useful book, focused on decolonizing the foundational text for all euro-christian colonialism of the past few centuries. Steve Heinrichs has brought together a superb list of authors and put them in conversation with one another. Both euro-christian and Native folk will benefit from reading this text.” —Dr. Tink Tinker (wazhazhe / Osage Nation), Iliff School of Theology

“Unsettling the Word is an important and animating vantage point for our reading of a text that was much abused in the colonization of Turtle Island. The reader will find new as well as familiar writers, all bringing the dis-comforting perspective that is entirely necessary to a healing of the wound that colonization has inflicted upon Indigenous peoples and, certainly, upon those who read the Scriptures with a commitment to living the Good Life/Walk.” —Rt. Rev. Mark MacDonald, National Indigenous Anglican Bishop for the Anglican Church of Canada

Review & Commentary