Bishop John Shelby Spong ~ June 16, 1931 – September 12, 2021
Bishop Spong provided a much needed place for those of us who did not connect with traditional theology. We love you Bishop Spong. You will be missed! Funeral services will be held at St. Peter’s, Morristown, NJ and at St. Paul’s, Richmond, VA. Dates and times will be announced as soon as they are available

Dear White Peacemakers

Dismantling Racism with Grit and Grace

Dear White Peacemakers is a breakup letter to division, a love letter to God’s beloved community, and an eviction notice to the violent powers that have sustained racism for centuries.

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A Rabbi’s Apology

To those affected by the discovery of mass graves of First Nations’ children In Canada.

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After Juneteenth, what does this 4th of July mean?

This July 4th, America will celebrate 245 years of independence from British rule. However, when President Joe Biden signed into law Juneteenth as a  federal holiday, it forces Americans to take a sterner look at what this July 4th means. 

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The Reunited States

Inspired by Mark Gerzon’s book of the same name, director Ben Rekhi’s of-the-moment documentary shares stories of everyday Americans on the courageous journey of bridging our political and racial divides.

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Pastor Donnie McClurkin’s struggle with sexuality mirrors the black church’s

The most significant factor that keeps the Black Church on the down-low are closeted, homophobic ministers. Pastor Donnie McClurkin- a three-time Gospel Grammy winner and the former poster boy for African American ex-gay ministries -is one example.  In a recent episode of TV One’s “Uncensored,” McClurkin talked about his sexual past. 

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A Character with True Character: Compassion as a Step We can All Take Toward Inclusivity

Deep-rooted, systemic racism and other forms of exclusivity, potential reparations, and related issues are complex and will take strong yet peaceful activism, advocacy, and commitment to satisfactorily address.

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Language still matters

I used the n-word, repeating what one of my black friends said. I was told I was wrong for using it. My black friends use it a lot and around us all. Why was I wrong for using it?

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For the Love of Black Women

When we talk about the reproductive justice movement, we mean the movement founded by Black women that is a part of the larger movement for reproductive health in the U.S. and globally.

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Some Thoughts on Healing the Great National Divide

The one thing I never imagined was that fascism could come to the United States. Unfortunately, the myth of American exceptionalism has been totally discredited. Fascism came close to coming to our shores during the last four years. Let’s hope that we as a society can take the steps necessary to see that such a threat never happens again.

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The Myths We Deem to be True and Sacred

In this new year – just when we thought things couldn’t get any worse — something dark and revelatory already happened on that day. Thousands of insurrectionists stormed the Capitol; wielding clubs, and bats, and – in one instance – a Bible.

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Gorman’s inauguration poem has black women talking

Amanda Gorman mesmerized a nation with her inauguration poem “The Hill We Climb.” The beauty of her presence and the power of her words captured a country battle-scarred and looking for a lifeline.

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The Hill We Climb

The words of Amanda Gorman, Poet Laureate, from her moving poem during the inauguration of Joseph Biden and Kamala Harris as President and Vice-President of the United States of America.

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What Shall We Say to These Things? Crafting a Social Gospel for the 21st Century

A 90 minute inter-generational conversation between Ruby Sales and Brittany Packnett Cunningham. This conversation will be moderated by Rev. Traci Blackmon.

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All Belong Here – The Many – Lyric Video

From their 2017 album, “All Belong Here,” this song is a new kind of call to communion, a call to remember who we are, and how much we are loved, a song that sees God’s table as a place where we all belong, and that this whole world is God’s table, where we can eat and be filled, where we can drink in the grace.

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Ordinary people with Extraordinary Vision

The late Congressman John Lewis wrote what could be his own eulogy in the essay he wrote to be published posthumously in the New York Times. He called on “ordinary people” to be willing to get into “good trouble.” Of course, the sins of racism, oppression, and enslavement were not creations of black culture.

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Faith on the Ballot

Weekly Sermon Series

Many believe this upcoming election is the most important one in our lifetimes, one of the key crossroads in American history. And we believe that racism is and must be named as a core religious issue in this electoral season—which for us is a confessional season about affirming the image of God in each and every one of us; which is at stake in our election choices.

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Progressives Vote As If…

Be part of the change our country needs by voting to protect the rights of all.

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Sermon: Ferocious Roots:Racism

Rev. Dr. Damaris D. Whittaker Sermon: Ferocious Roots:Racism – 07 12 20 Sermon
Fort Washington Church – July 12, 2020

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